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Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)
leading sonic technology brushes for a superior clean. oral-b power brushes. go to oralb.com for the latest offers. can you help me with something? nope! good talk. [ male announcer ] or free windows 8 training when you buy a computer at staples. another way staples makes it easier to upgrade. >>> all right. so, the big conversation happening in washington right now is about something which i think is misleadingly been mislabeled the fiscal cliff. it's termed by ben bernanke. >> i think we'll have a misunderstanding about what is going on. i want to take a second to set the context. it goes back to 2010. here is why i find the discussion maddening. 2010, tea party revolt, what happened? people on the right mobilized. there was a lot of backlash against obama care and there was this obsession with the debt and deficit. we are spending too much money, not taking in enough, it's going to hurt this country, we are going to get inflation, high interest rates, we will end up greece. republicans were elected. then a lame duck session. a huge conversation about how horrible the d
to the nasdaq, she is following the big movers. >> technology a sore spot for the markets now the s and p tech index trading in correction territory, microsoft down on the departure of the windows division head. management shakeups the street likes, this one they clearly don't a quick check on social media stocks, facebook shares under a little bit of pressure as the street braces for a possible postlockup selling, the biggest lockup since facebook went public. roughly 800 million shares, sue, back to you. >> thank you very much, seem ma. to the bond market now, rick santelli is tracking the action for us at the cme. how are yields doing today, ricky? >> still continues to be a one-way market. the only thing we a by how big of a one-way street is it on? today, only a couple of basis points. look at a chart starting august 1st most important feature, close to a two-month low in yields on the ten yours as well as the 30 as well as the bond. if we look at foreign exchange, very important, see october 1st dollar index, hey what is going on? dollar index is doing well. things really be that bad? ho
. you walk into a conventional mattress store, it's really not about you. we have so much technology in our store to really show the customers what's going on with their bodies. you can see a little more pressure in the shoulders and in the hips. ... now you can feel what happens as we raise your sleep number setting and allow the bed to contour to your individual shape. oh, wow. that feels really good. at sleep number we've created a collection of innovations dedicated to individualizing your comfort. the sleep number collection, designed around the innovative sleep number bed - a bed with dualair technology that allows you to adjust to the exact comfort your body needs. each of your bodies. so whatever you feel like, sleep number's going to provide it for you. during the final days of our semi-annual sleep sale, save $500 on our classic series special edition bed set plus special financing on selected beds but hurry sale ends sunday. you'll only find the innovative sleep number bed at one of our 400 stores, where queen mattresses start at just $699. >>> a deal on the fiscal cliff i
pressures and the uncertainties, and also other technology companies really did not have very good quarters as well. i thought the company did a very good job on execution, on cross control and market share gains. the fact that this company is grow revenues at 5.5% while its peers saw revenues decline 4.3% in the same time period, it really speaks to the market share gains that they're seeing and that the clear highlights to me were service provider video, retireless and data center all growing double digits nicely. >> kelly and i were talking about this earlier. cisco seems to sort of outperform -- seems to be an outliar. does well when others aren't and doesn't do well when others are. i'm wondering is that actually the case? because that's the appearance. and indeed whether we can take anything for the sector from this. >> i think the one thing that if you want to take away from cisco's quarter is that the u.s. enterprise for cisco grew 9%, versus 5% last quarter. that's the second quarter in a row where you saw acceleration. and this is a leading indicator for its broader businesses. th
are a proct of evolution. >> humans develop so many technologies, but always the hint or ideas are coming from human beings. are we going to use more robots and a robot will take a very important role in society. >> his robots recently appeared in a stage play in italy and in denmark they will join an experiment for the elderly. >>> many people living in japan along the sea of japan coast are experiencing stormy conditions. >> here in japan we are dealing with unstable conditions and upper cold air combined, making this nasty weather. fukui prefecture saw lots of hail and that was reported, so that will be persisting across similar regions all the way up towards northern japan on the sea of japan flank here. but also thunderstorms, frequent lightning, strong gusts. gusts of 75 kilometers r hour reported in niigata prefecture. on the pacific side as well, winds are going to be strong, picking up waves about 3 meters high. on top of that, really cold air is brought across much of the country and keeping things really chilly. this morning we saw very chilly weather. temperatures dropping down to
. but proven technologies allow natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> two women are dead after eating wild mushrooms. four others are in the hospital including the caregiver who picked the mushrooms and tossed them into a soup. local authorities are investigating now. a spokesman says that foul play is not suspected. >>> heart health experts meet ing last week in los angeles came up with several things everyone should know to keep our tickers humming along. the american heart association boiled down the list to top four. multivitamins don't reduce the risk. a lot of people think they do. but experts say they do not. number two, you're never too young for heart disease. people
and more of them. we keep pulling the resources out. is where technology can be really an important and powerful vehicle. i think initially we had to vent -- said several minutes of these people and we have data at about 50,000. i think they've done a lot, put up huge effort trying to improve that. >> we are at a time in the administration, the second term of the administration were question of legacy often comes into play. people start talking about what will this administration be remembered for. so i kind of wonder what you, if you have the opportunity, which he did when you're were in office, at least two of the dead and maybe the others had the opportunity, if this president and the secretary of state, a 20 minute conversation about public diplomacy and what could be done that was particularly useful to leave something behind for years from now, what would be, what kind of things would you bring up? just to give you time to think about, let me remind, the bush administration under secretary glassman together with microsoft and a bunch of other people put together a conference o
a lot of people talk about the science technology. >> engineering. >> engineering and math. right. [laughter] i do think -- i am all for studying all these interesting things, but i do think that having those kinds of skills -- the countries we worry about competing with us a lot of their focus is on those things that actually have real world usefulness in the economy, and germany for a long time i spent a reasonable amount of time in germany they've emphasized engineering and technical backgrounds and certainly china is doing it and as i said i'm also with historians and even economists. [laughter] but i do think that having a strong base of people with those kind of skills would be a great thing. >> i think the most important point is education matters a lot. if you look at the unemployment break down in the u.s. right now it is skewed very much to words high school graduates are sort of a range of numbers but i think it's around 13, 14%. and as you get up past high school graduate, college graduate advanced degree it drops precipitously in the there is a gap we have right now i
. >> reporter: until years later technology made day to night possible. >> you know, you can just see the way the light moves. it's pretty exciting. i love when the lights come up, you know. >> reporter: remember central park in the fall? back at his studio in connecticut, the first thing steven wilkes has to do is decide literally where to draw the line. where day ends and night will begin. in the final print. >> you can actually see it as time changes. >> reporter: the next step is to look at everyone of the images he shot, collect his favorites and then digitally fit them together like puzzle pieces. you could go blind looking at 1400 of those. >> you're looking for some small, tiny nuanced detail. >> reporter: like the brides. the brides started to evolve. i mean basically i saw one in the morning. midday. i mean they literally were showing up all day long. >> reporter: here they all are in the finished photograph. >> it was really kind of a moment like a where's waldo. as i ket shooting i kept noticing another bride here. >> reporter: what took that one october day to shoot took four mon
legitimate business decisions exside technology, bristol myers. >> they might be legitimate business decisions but it's not because of the results of the election. come on. >> laura: some of them are actually saying it's the result of the election. >> they may be saying it to absolve them of their own i how the business has or has not grown, really come on. >> laura: you think that employers generally enjoy laying off part-time? i actually know a lot of people who run medium sized businesses. they are never happier than when they are in hiring mode. that means business is growing. money on the take. >> absolutely. >> laura: they do have to plan do they not for the implementation of this knew monstrosity. this is a big big burden to businesses. >> you mean healthcare? >> laura: yeah, obama care. it is a big number for businesses to swallow at a time where margins are quite narrow. a lot of these people these aren't political decisions. a lot of these people i assume voted for president obama. a lot of them probably supported him initially but a business is business. this could be deva
of infringing on its technology. and citigroup will pay 15.5 million each to former ceo vehicle recomme vikram pandit reflectinging t t progress the coma. >> some of it was money that it already -- i thought the number was 6.6 smld what they actually gave him as an incentive fee. >> for leaving? >> well, that's the irony of it. >> going quietly maybe. >> he didn't go that quietly actually. he said it was his choice. he blamed everybody else. >> that's all boiler plate, isn't it? >> i guess so. >> so the jacket was deliberate. >> honestly i said to myself i don't have a pin today and maybe i will just not wear the jacket as a wave rising above. >> interesting. >> mac even came over to hand me the jacket. >> i saw. >> deliberate. >> goldman sachs is in settlement talks over an $8.3 billion position that one of the traders had concealed five years ago. a settlement is expected in coming weeks. and i probably -- do i look different today? no? not really? >> did you get a haircut? >> no. i got power. last night. >> you got power. >> last night. >> like 11:00 last night? >> 11:00. >> so almost two f
in technology. alcoa is one of the largest and oldest companies in america. it's been hiring skilled workers since 1888, and today has factories around the globe. at its aerospace plant in whitehall, michigan, 2,100 employees are working three shifts a day, seven days a week. german-born c.e.o. klaus kleinfeld says alcoa's competitive edge is innovation, backed up by a skilled workforce. they're producing parts that make jet engines 50% more fuel efficient. >> klaus kleinfeld: i would love to show you how the air flow goes inside. but that's part of probably the best-kept secret that this industry has. that's the innovation i'm talking about. >> pitts: and a person just can't walk off the street and put that together for you. >> kleinfeld: impossible. >> pitts: kari belanger came to alcoa with an engineering degree. the company trained her to program robots to do the work that, 50 years ago, was done by hand. alcoa also helped pay for rod coley to go back to school and get his engineering degree. he x-rays parts to make sure they're perfect before they leave the factory. what do you say to f
, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. and you pick the price that works for you. great. whoa, whoa, jamie. watch where you point that thing. [ mocking ] "watch where you point that thing." you point yours, i point mine. okay, l-let's stay calm. [ all shouting ] put it down! be cool! everybody, just be cool! does it price better on the side? no, it just looks cooler. the name your price tool, only from progressive. call or click today. i got you covered. thank you. oh, you're so welcome. >>> new york stock exchange suffered a trading glitch. an outage shortly after they opened monday on its matching engine. trading halted for more than 200 stocks. once they determined their official closing price based
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)